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Published on June 4th, 2013 | by Vincent Jobse

Damn 38: on photography and the transvesty of technique

The transvesty of progress in the latest issue of DAMn Magazine.

While mobile telephones have become a kind of body part to most people, and are fully accepted, the technique that supports these omnipresent tools is looked upon quite differently. Telephone masts are ugly and have to disguished, seems to be the general opinion. As what? As parts of nature, of course. Palm trees, maple trees, elms and cactusses.

In the new DAMn, Brussels based magazine on design and culture, and one of our favorites, two photographers of telephone poles in one article. Robert Voit, who takes the masts at face value, and Dillon Marsh, who works hard to emphasize their unnaturalness and unwelcome presence.

Voit photographed about 400 masts in the period 2003 – 2010, and has a sociological view on them: ‘it is also about how we as human beings change the way we influence the world and try to take over these strong symbols’. Marsh’s serie is quite smaller – 12 images made in Cape Town, called Invasive Species: “I like the humour – the fact that they’re not living up to what they’re meant to be or meant to look like’.

Both comments raise interesting design questions: should all trees look like an existing tree? How abstract can a tree be? Can telephone trees become a whole new species?

See:

www.robertvoit.com
www.dillonmarsh.com

 

Source:

DAMn – a magazine on contemporary culture
No 38 / May June 2013
176 pages / Language: English

 Order / subscribe: DAMn

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About the Author

Vincent Jobse is a Dutch design addict, who fully enjoys the pleasures of the web, but who loves print on pure, old-fashioned paper.



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